Nostalgic food from all over

Random food and beverages from my several homes. Growing up in parts of India, you often come across the Jamun tree. The fruit has a purple bitter sweet flesh. This drink from India tries to capture the flavour for urban people who miss jamun picking. Next is a popular rice cake from Hanoi, North Vietnam (thanks to childhood friend Trang for getting it for me). This cake is made by a family business in the Hang Than Street - that had many similar rice cake shops. Nguyen means origin, and Ninh is derived from the name of the hometown (Yen Ninh) of the original owner of the cake shop. Last is a well being/health drink from Indonesia, contains honey and several herbs. You can buy these sachets from convenience stores or small shops across Indonesia.

The love of free food

I dropped in to this cafe in Kuala Lumpur. I was surprised to hear the girls working there speak Khmer. Most wait staff in these parts are from Vietnam or Myanmar. They were equally curious about me when I got them to play some Khmer songs from my phone. There was this one girl, who came to chat with me. Not yet 20, she had left her home to support the education of her younger sibling after both her parents had passed away. Unlike the others in the shop, she was not glued to her smartphone. She said she liked talking to the customers, it helped her learn English and Chinese.

We spoke of life in Cambodia, the recent politics - seems she followed the news online, and the food. I said I missed the food the most. She offered to share her dinner. I accepted. She had made simple chicken porridge, she brought out a bowl and poured out a generous helping, even added a select piece of meat, and pepper and lime. 

I am never the one to miss free food. Free food always tastes better. Because more often than not, free food is offered out of love, and there is no better garnish than the affection we share with people who start as strangers, but soon enough we find some connection with them - even if it is something as trivial as mutual liking for an old Khmer song or common interest in latest political gossip from back home.

The contraband

You hear Thai voices outside and you know that the van it is here. The larger immigrant community in Johor have their own ethnic hangouts, but the smaller ones have to make do with such mobile stores. The van has stuff from all over Thailand - condiments, snacks and food. Half a dozen Thai women are around the truck, grabbing the best stuff. I know better not to join the raid - I won't stand a chance.  These ladies are from the neighbourhood Thai spas. They get stronger by the day, squeezing, stretching, and manipulating out of shape, big car driving neighbourhood clientele. I let them have their pick. I concentrate all my mental gaze on that box of pad kra pao gai (minced chicken), hoping that I can make it invisible till the ladies leave. 

Eating well while traveling

These days, I try to prepare my own meal. Most hostels have microwave. A head of broccoli takes about 2 minutes on medium heat to cook. Cut into small pieces, place in a ziplock bag. Don’t seal the bag. Careful with the steam when you unload into a bowl. 

Introducing Kimchi Dosa

It is said that Koreans form one of the biggest expatriate community in India. But what’s the point if we still have not combined the greatest frood from the two countries. As someone who was born in India but has Korean stomach, I decided to myself undertake this responsibility. Presenting the kimchi dosa.

Here is the humble dosa, a staple South Indian food. And Cabbage Kimchi from our Korea.

Combine the two and you get healthy and crunchy Kimchi Dosa.